Yuhan Kimberly Case Study

Yuhan-Kimberly queries validity of sanitary pad toxicity study

By Won Ho-jung
Personal care products company Yuhan-Kimberly on Monday released an official statement questioning the validity of a study conducted last year on the toxicity of sanitary pads being sold in Korea.

“The Food and Drug Safety Ministry has stated that the scientific validity of the study is questionable, which is why we are waiting for the results of the government’s ongoing study instead before making any definitive claims,” a spokesperson for the company said. 


The statement came after news reports claimed Sunday that the company’s products were shown to have the highest levels of carcinogens among the 11 products included in the study, which was commissioned by a women’s rights group here. Yuhan-Kimberly produces two of the top personal care products brands in Korea, White and Good Feel.

According to Yuhan-Kimberly, the news reports “misrepresented” the results of the study. The highest levels of carcinogens were actually found in reusable cotton products, the company said. 

Yuhan-Kimberly said it had run its own tests with a certified institution and obtained results that showed negligible levels of toxins such as benzene and toluene.

“Once the government completes its study and establishes safety standards for chemicals in sanitary pads, we are planning to run our own tests to confirm the government’s results,” the spokesman said.

By Won Ho-jung (hjwon@heraldcorp.com)

Copyright © 2011. Routledge. All rights reserved. May not be reproduced in any form without permission from the publisher, except fair uses permitted under U.S. or
applicable copyright law. Chapter Fifteen The Crisis Communications
Plan Crisis Inventory
Before an organization can develop a crisis management plan or a crisis
communications plan, it must determine which crisis or crises the organization is most likely to face. A crisis communications plan’s usefulness
is directly associated with how specific it is to a particular type of crisis.
The workbook for this text takes the user through a step-by-step
process of developing the crisis communications plan. Although there are
several items in the plan that are mutual to all types of crises, varying
information is needed for each type of crisis for maximum effectiveness.
For example, a restaurant chain may decide that food poisoning and fire
are its most probable crises. If a food poisoning crisis occurs, the media
will want, and the public relations department should have, the following
items readily available and in its crisis communications plan: recipes, a
list of ingredients stocked, a list of vendors used, kitchen precautions and
procedures, names and contact numbers of chefs and all other personnel
handling food, and a list of medical experts for consultation and as
spokespersons.
If a fire occurs, the public relations department should have, in a specific
crisis communications plan, information about its evacuation procedures,
its policy on using nonflammable decor items (such as window coverings
and tablecloths), the floor plan of the structure, and fire experts for
spokespersons.
The following list enumerates common types of crises. There are, of
course, numerous others. Companies and organizations are advised
to consider the list carefully and add types of crises specific to their
operations.
Common Types of Crises
acquisition
age discrimination
alcohol abuse bankruptcy
boycott
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applicable copyright law. 302 The Crisis Communications Plan chemical spill or leak
computer failure
computer hacking
contamination
data loss/theft
drug abuse
drug trafficking
earthquake
embezzlement
explosion
fatality
fire
flood
hacking
hurricane
kickbacks
kidnapping
lawsuits
layoffs
merger murder
negative legislation
plant closing
product failure
protest demonstrations
racial issues
robbery
sexual discrimination
sexual harassment
strikes
suicide
takeover
tax problems
terrorism
tornado
toxic waste
transportation accident
transportation failure
workplace violence Some crises will involve more than one of the types listed, such as workplace violence and fatality, or boycott and sexual discrimination.
Perhaps the involvement of the entire company or of representatives
from each department can help determine the crises the company is likely
to face. Then each unit’s selections could be compared and compiled into
a company-wide list. When done properly, this can be an effective
proactive employee relations program, a way of creating “we-ness,” a
way of including all of the employees in the company’s decision making.
Janitors, executive assistants, blue-collar and white-collar workers,
midlevel executives, as well as top executives can have a say. After all,
each employee stands to suffer if the company should go under after the
most serious of crises. Furthermore, employees in each position
classification have unique perspectives on things that can go wrong.
Janitors are more aware of heating and cooling equipment, possible gas
leaks, and so on. Workers on an automobile assembly line know more
about the quality of cars than managers in carpeted offices.
However, if a company-wide crisis identification program is not
feasible, a meeting of key employees familiar with all facets of the
operation can determine the crises the company is likely to face. Such a
meeting should certainly include more than public relations staff members.
You do not want the company blaming the public relations staff for the
failure to recognize a possible crisis. EBSCO Publishing : eBook Collection (EBSCOhost) - printed on 5/13/2016 11:50 PM via AMERICAN PUBLIC
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AN: 339910 ; Fearn-Banks, Kathleen.; Crisis Communications : A Casebook Approach
Account: s7348467 Copyright © 2011. Routledge. All rights reserved. May not be reproduced in any form without permission from the publisher, except fair uses permitted under U.S. or
applicable copyright law. The Crisis Communications Plan 303 Frequently, ascertaining probable crises can point out problems that
prevent crises from occurring. This is the primary reason for companywide involvement. The second best reason is being able to manage a crisis
once it occurs.
Every company and organization can experience many types of crises.
Two questions must be answered: (a) How likely is this crisis? and (b)
how devastating can the crisis be? Crisis communications plans should
be developed for all crises believed to be both most probable and most
devastating. To do this, the public relations department, with its key
executives, must take an inventory. Each possible crisis must be ranked
as follows:
0—Impossible; that is, the crisis has basically no chance of occurring.
1—Nearly impossible.
2—Remotely possible.
3—Possible.
4—Somewhat probable; has happened to similar companies.
5—Highly probable; may or may not have previously occurred in the
company, but warning signs are evident.
Each crisis also should be ranked according to its potential damage to
the company. The rankings in this category are as follows:
0—No damage, not a serious consequence.
1—Little damage, can be handled without much difficulty, not serious
enough for the media’s concern.
2—Some damage, a slight chance that the media will be involved.
3—Considerable damage, but still will not be a major media issue.
4—Considerable damage, would definitely be a major media issue.
5—Devastating, front-page news, could put company out of business.
For added security, when in doubt, rank a crisis in the next highest
category. For instance, Company Z determines that there are five crises
it could face: workplace violence, fire, protest demonstrations, negative
legislation, and tax problems. Each of these crises might be ranked as
shown in Figure 15.1.
Keep in mind that a crisis you determine to be unlikely simply because
it has never happened before can happen tomorrow. Both human nature
and mother nature are very unpredictable, so natural disasters (e.g.,
earthquakes, floods, and hurricanes) and human failures should be
expected to some degree.
After rankings for probability and damage are made, bar graphs should
be made to clearly see and consider each crisis and compare it to others.
(Bar graphing can be done on various computer programs or by hand.) EBSCO Publishing : eBook Collection (EBSCOhost) - printed on 5/13/2016 11:50 PM via AMERICAN PUBLIC
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AN: 339910 ; Fearn-Banks, Kathleen.; Crisis Communications : A Casebook Approach
Account: s7348467 Copyright © 2011. Routledge. All rights reserved. May not be reproduced in any form without permission from the publisher, except fair uses permitted under U.S. or
applicable copyright law. 304 The Crisis Communications Plan Company Z’s Crisis Inventory 5 4 3 2 1 0
Workplace
violence Fire Protest
demonstrations = Damage Negative
legislation Tax
problems = Probability Figure 15.1 A sample bar graph showing how an organization might assess the
probability of, and degrees of damage resulting from, various types of crises. At the base of each graph, write the name of each type of crisis. Plot the
height of each bar according to numbers attributed to each crisis in the
probability and damage rankings. Choose different colors or shadings
for probability bars and damage bars.
When Company Z plots its data on a bar graph, it resembles Figure
15.1. Considering Company Z’s graph, we see that the probability and EBSCO Publishing : eBook Collection (EBSCOhost) - printed on 5/13/2016 11:50 PM via AMERICAN PUBLIC
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AN: 339910 ; Fearn-Banks, Kathleen.; Crisis Communications : A Casebook Approach
Account: s7348467 Copyright © 2011. Routledge. All rights reserved. May not be reproduced in any form without permission from the publisher, except fair uses permitted under U.S. or
applicable copyright law. The Crisis Communications Plan 305 seriousness of a crisis relating to tax problems is not as crucial as in the
other crises. This does not mean that a crisis plan is not important for
tax problems; it’s just not as important as for other issues, and not a
priority.
According to the graph, the possibility of Company Z’s suffering a
crisis resulting from negative legislation is likely, though not particularly critical. On the other hand, protest demonstrations are critical,
although not very likely. Workplace violence and fire seem both likely
and critical.
Most organizations plan for crises ranked high in both probability and
damage. In this case, Company Z would probably develop crisis management and communications plans for workplace violence first, then for
the other crises in descending order of importance: fire, protest demonstrations, negative legislation, and tax problems.
Sometimes organizations make crisis plans for the most devastating
crises no matter how probable or improbable they may be. In this case,
Company Z would develop plans for workplace violence first, followed
by protest demonstrations, then fire. Naturally, a version of Murphy’s
Law can be expected: That crisis for which you have no plan will likely
happen. However, you will find that any plan, and the process of
developing that plan, will make you more prepared for crises generally.
Some organizations, having several crises classified with similar
rankings in all categories, make general crisis communications plans
with detailed information for all types of crises, although sometimes the
detailed information is omitted.
Many companies, fearing all possibilities of crises equally, merely
adopt a policy of “open and honest response” with the media and all
publics, and plan to be in a total reactive mode during a crisis.
The importance of the crisis inventory is to force organizations to think
about the possibilities. Sometimes the most ridiculous crisis occurs,
something no one in the company could predict. Pepsi probably never
dreamed that it would have a crisis about hypodermic syringes in its cans.
On the other hand, Foodmaker and Jack-in-the-Box could certainly have
anticipated children dying from eating hamburgers, and Exxon could have
anticipated a devastating oil spill.
The ranking procedure may introduce ideas for prevention programs.
You also may realize that your organization is more vulnerable than you
anticipated.
Considering that the toll of stress and emotion during a crisis necessarily
affects one’s thought processes, a carefully developed crisis communications plan is the best substitute for a fully functioning brain. Even if you
remain cool and calm under pressure, others in the company may not.
The crisis communications plan alleviates this problem, too. EBSCO Publishing : eBook Collection (EBSCOhost) - printed on 5/13/2016 11:50 PM via AMERICAN PUBLIC
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AN: 339910 ; Fearn-Banks, Kathleen.; Crisis Communications : A Casebook Approach
Account: s7348467 Copyright © 2011. Routledge. All rights reserved. May not be reproduced in any form without permission from the publisher, except fair uses permitted under U.S. or
applicable copyright law. 306 The Crisis Communications Plan Developing the Crisis Communications Plan
Once likely crises have been identified, the crisis communications plan
can be written. A crisis communications plan can be part of a larger crisis
management plan (CMP) or it may be a stand-alone document to help
public relations practitioners handle crises more effectively.
The CMP includes information such as evacuation procedures,
emergency staffing of various departments of a company, and places to
purchase or rent emergency equipment, tools, or vehicles—all the things
a company may need in a crisis.
Public relations during a crisis focuses on communications with the
company’s publics during the crisis—for the most part, the same publics
to which normal PR activities are directed.
The CMP is sometimes a large volume of instructions, whereas a crisis
communications plan should be a more manageable, easier-to-read
document. After a crisis has erupted, employees are likely to look at a
large volume and say, “We don’t have time to read this now,” and then
proceed to handle the crisis by “winging” it. The crisis communications
plan should be organized in such a way that the practitioners can quickly
turn to each section. Some professionals use tabs in a notebook; others
use a table of contents. Keeping the crisis communications plan on a
computer can be dangerous because many crises prevent access to offices
(fire, earthquakes, explosives, etc.).
Many companies (such as Johnson & Johnson after the Tylenol crisis)
urge employees to keep copies of the plan in various key spots—the office,
at home, near the night stand, or in the car. That way, the odds are good
that at least one copy will be readily available should a crisis or disaster
occur.
If a crisis inventory determines, for example, that there are three likely
crises, the organization should draft a crisis communications plan for
each type. A plan for an earthquake must be different from a plan for a
product failure. The publics may be different; the media may be different;
the message must be different.
The crisis communications plan states purposes, policies, and goals,
then assigns employees to various duties. It generally makes communication with publics faster and more effective and should help end the crisis
more swiftly than without a plan.
When a crisis communications plan is ineffective, it is usually because
the type of crisis was not anticipated or because variables arose that were
not anticipated. For example, spokespersons or supplies may not be
available. The crisis communications plan sometimes fails because it is
outdated. Such plans should be updated regularly.
Even if unanticipated variables do arise, the crisis communications
plan should be more effective than having no plan at all. Still, it must be EBSCO Publishing : eBook Collection (EBSCOhost) - printed on 5/13/2016 11:50 PM via AMERICAN PUBLIC
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AN: 339910 ; Fearn-Banks, Kathleen.; Crisis Communications : A Casebook Approach
Account: s7348467 Copyright © 2011. Routledge. All rights reserved. May not be reproduced in any form without permission from the publisher, except fair uses permitted under U.S. or
applicable copyright law. The Crisis Communications Plan 307 remembered that a crisis communications plan is not a manual guaranteeing success, with everything done “by the book,” but rather a guide
that must be flexible.
An effective crisis communications plan should have the following
components, arranged in an order that best suits the organization and
the particular crisis or disaster:






















• cover page
introduction
acknowledgments
rehearsal dates
purpose and objectives
list of key publics
notifying publics
identifying the crisis communications team
crisis directory
identifying the media spokesperson
list of emergency personnel and local officials
list of key media
spokespersons for related organizations
crisis communications control center
equipment and supplies
pregathered information
key messages
website
blogs and social media
trick questions
list of prodromes
list of related Internet URLs
evaluation form. Cover Page
The cover page of a crisis communications plan is similar to the cover
page of a term paper. There are as many ways of doing one as there are
ways of doing crisis communications plans. It should include at least the
date when the plan was written as well as revision dates.
Introduction
The head of the company or organization usually writes the introduction
(or the PR practitioner ghostwrites it for the CEO with his or her
approval). The purpose of this component is to persuade employees to
take the crisis communications plan seriously. It stresses the necessity and EBSCO Publishing : eBook Collection (EBSCOhost) - printed on 5/13/2016 11:50 PM via AMERICAN PUBLIC
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AN: 339910 ; Fearn-Banks, Kathleen.; Crisis Communications : A Casebook Approach
Account: s7348467 Copyright © 2011. Routledge. All rights reserved. May not be reproduced in any form without permission from the publisher, except fair uses permitted under U.S. or
applicable copyright law. 308 The Crisis Communications Plan importance of the plan and it emphasizes the dire results possible when
a plan is not followed.
Acknowledgments
This crisis communications plan component takes the form of an affidavit
signed by all crisis personnel as well as by key executives, indicating that
they have read the plan and are prepared to put it into effect. The signatures assure management that its personnel have read the plan.
Rehearsal Dates
Dates of rehearsals for all crises are recorded here. The most damaging
and most likely crises should be practiced at least annually if not every
6 months. Rehearsal for any type of crisis is helpful even if an eventual
crisis turns out to be somewhat different.
Purpose and Objectives
The purpose statement details the organization’s policies toward its
publics. It might say, for example, “In a crisis, an open and honest
disclosure with the media shall be stressed.” The purpose is an expressed
hope for a recovery and return to normalcy, to get out of the media. The
objectives are responses to the question, “What do you hope to achieve
with this plan?” Objectives should not be overly ambitious in difficulty
or number. For example, a company may adopt the following goals:
1. To be seen in the media as a company that cares about its customers
and employees.
2. To make certain that all communications are accurate.
List of Key Publics
The key publics list should include all publics, both external and internal,
with which the organization must communicate during the crisis. The
list varies with organizations, but may include the following as well as
others:





• board members
shareholders
financial partners
investors
community leaders
customers EBSCO Publishing : eBook Collection (EBSCOhost) - printed on 5/13/2016 11:50 PM via AMERICAN PUBLIC
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applicable copyright law. The Crisis Communications Plan •










• 309 clients
suppliers
vendors
neighbors of physical plant(s)
competitors
key management
employees
legal representation
media
union officials
retirees
government officials (city, state, county, federal). Although all publics need not be notified in every crisis, the list of key
publics should be comprehensive. It is easier to eliminate unneeded
publics at the time of crisis than it is to think of all the crucial publics
during the stress of a crisis.
Publics fall into the following categories:
• • • • Enabling publics—those people with the power and authority to make
decisions: the board of directors, shareholders, investors, and key
executives. Notifying enabling publics is a priority.
Functional publics—the people who actually make the organization
work: employees, unions, suppliers, vendors, consumers, and volunteers in the case of nonprofit organizations.
Normative publics—those people who share values with the organization in crises: trade associations, professional organizations, and
competitors.
Diffused publics—those people linked indirectly to the organization
in crisis: the media, community groups, and neighbors of the physical
plant. Notifying Publics
To notify publics, a system must be devised for contacting each public,
and that system should be described in the crisis communications plan.
Social media networks such as Facebook groups can be used if people
use computers constantly. For internal publics, many companies use a
chain procedure, such as a telephone tree, in which each person is
specifically designated to call others. The person who learns about the
crisis first notifies the CEO, the head of public relations, and the head
of the department that may be involved. The chain should be clear and
error-free, even in the event that certain individuals are not reached. EBSCO Publishing : eBook Collection (EBSCOhost) - printed on 5/13/2016 11:50 PM via AMERICAN PUBLIC
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Account: s7348467 Copyright © 2011. Routledge. All rights reserved. May not be reproduced in any form without permission from the publisher, except fair uses permitted under U.S. or
applicable copyright law. 310 The Crisis Communications Plan An appropriate means of notification must be decided on for each
public. A news release, for example, is appropriate primarily for the news
media, not for other publics.
Board members are often reached by telephone or fax. E-mail or other
computerized communications are also used. The media can be notified
by way of telephone, wire service, fax, press conference, e-mail, or news
release. Other methods used for notifying publics include telegrams,
personal visits, letters, advertisements, bulletin boards, and meetings (see
Figure 15.2).
Identifying the Crisis Communications Team
The crisis communications team members, along with back-ups, should
be preselected. The team manager is usually, but not always, the head
of public relations. He or she has specific responsibilities: communicating
with top management, making decisions, drafting or approving major
statements, and notifying the rest of the crisis communications team. YOUR
COMPANY MESSAGE: There has been an explosion in the plant. There are injured employees. We do not know, at this time,
the cause of the explosion or the extent of the injuries of the employees. An investigation is underway. Methods of Communication
TELEPHONE EMPLOYEES EXECUTIVES P
U
B
L
I
C
S EMAIL LETTER BY
MESSENGER *Nelson J. BULLETIN
BOARD *J. Naas *J. Naas PERSONAL
VISIT NEWS
RELEASE *Nelson J.
M. Yerima MEETINGS *Nelson J. *Damien L. BOARD OF
DIRECTORS *Nelson J. ELECTRONIC
MEDIA *K. Stone DAILY
NEWSPAPERS *Gina A. COMMUNITY
LEADERS NEWSLETTER *Nelson J. CUSTOMERS SHARE
HOLDERS LETTER
BY MAIL * J. Naas *Damien L. *Gina A. *K. Sone *Gina A. *Gina A. WEEKLY
NEWSPAPERS
*Staff member
responsible for
communications
and followup FAX *Gina A. *Ann C. *Damien L. *Ann C. *Karen N. *Karen N. Figure 15.2 A sample chart showing how an organization might plan to communicate
with key publics during a crisis. It includes key talking points and ways of
communicating. The lists of publics and types of communication can be
longer, shorter, or otherwise different depending on the organization’s
needs. EBSCO Publishing : eBook Collection (EBSCOhost) - printed on 5/13/2016 11:50 PM via AMERICAN PUBLIC
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AN: 339910 ; Fearn-Banks, Kathleen.; Crisis Communications : A Casebook Approach
Account: s7348467 Copyright © 2011. Routledge. All rights reserved. May not be reproduced in any form without permission from the publisher, except fair uses permitted under U.S. or
applicable copyright law. The Crisis Communications Plan 311 The assistant crisis manager assumes responsibility when the manager
is unavailable (a second back-up may be beneficial, if possible). The control
room coordinator sets up the room with necessary furniture, equipment,
supplies, and tools. An efficient executive assistant can be appointed for
this position.
Other PR personnel have the responsibilities of preparing news releases
and statements, contacting the media, and reporting all actions to the
crisis communications manager. These people may notify employees or
volunteers through letters or by writing telegrams to the mayor and
governor, by telephoning union officials and others, and so forth.
Crisis Directory
The company should prepare a crisis directory, listing all members of the
crisis team, key managers in the company, and key publics or organizations, along with titles, business and home telephone numbers, cellular
phone numbers, fax and e-mail addresses, as well as business, home, and
vacation addresses. It is also helpful to list the phone numbers of friends,
neighbors, and relatives who are frequently...

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